Thursday, November 10, 2005

Can you stomach the truth?

Friendlier people have tried to hide their wince whenever I steer conversations to touch upon the issue. Most I've met hate to take part in any of the arguments (a word which is sadly taken by many to bear an equal meaning to quarrels), either because knowing themselves, they fear they would turn hostile as the discussion gets interesting, hence hurting the acquaintanceship (which is a hasty correlation at best), or they really only fear to talk about something they never paid serious mind to.

But it's interesting to see that I was seldom the person determined to bring up the topic. Seeing the flag raised by another, I merely seized my opportunity and refused to let it slip off the conversation before it was amply addressed. When I did choose to take over the helm I did that simply because I've realized that such issues haven't been amply addressed in most cases, and that in turn has damaged our ability to think clearly about really important matters; namely, the perception of right and wrong conducts.

It is not my intention to expound my arguments here and demonstrate an upper hand over people whom I've ever engaged in this kind of discussions with. For the purpose of this entry I only want to accentuate the fact that it is most unnecessary for anyone of us to sidestep the issue as if treading a mine-filled territory. I know many people favor social congeniality over the pursuit of truth. But unfortunately for many (including myself), truth is not always something likeable by virtue of its nature. Unlike what some think, no wrong conduct can be made right or justifiable simply because we like it or hope something good to come out of it.

Truth is tough stuff, both intellectually and emotionally. But without truth that is not subjectively defined life instantly becomes a bondage of lies and delusions; it is the only basis upon which true and lasting freedom is built. And to my fellow believers in Christ: Are we to prize emotional and intellectual comforts above Him who did not spare the ransom to demonstrate to us the truth of our fallenness and to free us for His love?

Labels: , ,

6 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

i know i m in the wrong place to give this comment but i cant find a place for me to comment on this. your layout for this blog looks very simple and yet refreshing! i like it! where do you get the graceville tag from? hehehe...anyway good work!

November 11, 2005 1:02 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

My brother in Christ, why do you still question your faith?

November 11, 2005 3:24 PM  
Blogger Tin Soldier said...

Hi anonymous, thanks for your kind comments. The tag is modified from a stock photograph that I find suited for what I want to do with improving the look of graceville. I'm very glad you like it. Please come back often and feel free to give your inputs on everything else.


Quote: "My brother in Christ, why do you still question your faith?"

Hi there, another anonymous! Honestly I don't know how this entry gave you the impression that I'm questioning my faith. And for lack of further qualifying of your comment, you sound as if you're treating such a thing as suicidal. Even if I (or anyone for that matter) am indeed questioning my faith, are we to hastily take it to mean that we are questioning the truth? What if my faith is based on beliefs that have no roots in truth, but in mere church traditions or man's teachings? Am I not to question it all the more fervently in order to get to the truth and set my path straight? One question every person should ask themselves, regardless of their religious convictions or a lack thereof, is this: Am I trusting something or someone for the right reasons or am I trusting only because I'm afraid not to? As one of the greats put it, An unexamined life is not worth living.

Hope this clarifies things a bit for you.

Cheers,
TS

November 11, 2005 4:47 PM  
Anonymous alyssa said...

What truth are you seeking, TS?

November 11, 2005 7:35 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hello again TS,

Indeed it is man's nature to be doubtful at all times. Questioning anything and everything that there is until we find solid proof or some logical explanations or findings that could somehow convinced us of that the truth.

You have a lot of unanswered questions, and so does the rest of population of mankind. Some seek and yearns for answers (like you). But there are others who preferred to be followers -- no questions asked, just follow the pack. The reasons could merely be for the sake of convenience or given the mindset of "better safe than sorry".

Quote:
"What if my faith is based on beliefs that have no roots in truth, but in mere church traditions or man's teachings? Am I not to question it all the more fervently in order to get to the truth and set my path straight? One question every person should ask themselves, regardless of their religious convictions or a lack thereof, is this: Am I trusting something or someone for the right reasons or am I trusting only because I'm afraid not to?"


I agree. We are curious beings. We believed that there should be an explanation in every single thing that is happening around us -- be it logical or not. The truth is out there alright, waiting for the right time to reveal itself. I believed there is only one way to find out: Pray. Pray to the Almighty Father for guidance and answers; and He in turn will reveal the truth to us in His way, in His time.

Cheers to you mate!

-- Anonymous (2)

November 11, 2005 8:09 PM  
Blogger Tin Soldier said...

Anon2:

You're absolutely right about prayers. But my concern here is not about whether or not the answers would come at all, but whether or not we are able to recognize them when we see them. The thing that I take issue with here has more to do with our natural tendency to dodge truth, rather than our ability to know it. I have no problems asking for what I want. I only have problems asking for what I don't want but is good for me. We could be the most earnest pray-ers and yet still miss the truth when the light we ask for comes in the form of lightning. If I find myself able to stare into the midday sun without any difficulty or aid, I should question if what I'm seeing is really the sun and not its watered-down imitation. Likewise, most of us are content to settle with the likeness of truth rather than truth itself, and that's what concerns me.

Alyssa:

I think there's only one truth we should all strive to seek; the kind that frees us from ourselves. And truth be told, I wish I'm looking hard enough.

November 11, 2005 11:02 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home